New efficient method for urine analysis may tell us more

Our urine reveals our well-being and how we treat our body. A researcher has developed an effective method of analysis for examining the constituents of a urine sample, using contrast agent, as a cost-effective adjuvant. This can have a major impact on future healthcare. Source: Science Daily, https://www.sciencedaily.com

It's Fab! A hidden touch of antibody

Antibodies are key players in our immune system and have been used as biopharmaceuticals. The collaborative groups including researchers have found previously unknown contact sites in the antibody molecule that are involved in its binding to a cognate receptor, challenging the traditional paradigm of the molecular mechanism of antibody function. Source: Science Daily, https://www.sciencedaily.com

Smart sink could help save water

An experiment with a water-saving ‘smart’ faucet shows potential for reducing water use. The catch? Unbeknownst to study participants, the faucet’s smarts came from its human controller. Source: Science Daily, https://www.sciencedaily.com

Link between brain immune cells and Alzheimer's disease development identified

Scientists have discovered how to forestall Alzheimer’s disease in a laboratory setting, a finding that could one day help in devising targeted drugs that prevent it. The researchers found that by removing brain immune cells known as microglia from rodent models of Alzheimer’s disease, beta-amyloid plaques — the hallmark pathology of AD — never formed. … pročitajte više

Repeated semen exposure promotes host resistance to infection in preclinical HIV model

Contrary to the long-held view that semen can only act as a way to transmit HIV-1 from men to women, scientists found that frequent and sustained semen exposure can change the characteristics of the circulating and vaginal tissue immune cells that are targets for infection, reducing the susceptibility to a future infection. Source: Science Daily, … pročitajte više

Insight into cells' 'self-eating' process could pave the way for new dementia treatments

Cells regularly go through a process called autophagy — literally translated as ‘self-eating’ — which helps to destroy bacteria and viruses after infection. Now new research has shed light on the mechanisms behind autophagy and how it progresses — particularly relating to a process called liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Source: Science Daily, https://www.sciencedaily.com

Antibiotic use linked to heightened bowel cancer risk

Antibiotic use (pills/capsules) is linked to a heightened risk of bowel (colon) cancer, but a lower risk of rectal cancer, and depends, to some extent, on the type and class of drug prescribed, suggests new research. Source: Science Daily, https://www.sciencedaily.com

Lifestyle counselling and mobile application helped people change their lifestyle

Finnish StopDia study yielded promising preliminary results in reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle guidance in a group and application that supports the adoption of healthy lifestyle habits helped participants to reduce their waist circumference and improve their dietary habits. For example, their fruit and vegetable consumption increased. Source: Science Daily, https://www.sciencedaily.com

A lack of self control during adolescence is not uniquely human

Impulsiveness in adolescence isn’t just a phase, it’s biology. And despite all the social factors that define our teen years, the human brain and the brains of other primates go through very similar changes, particularly in the areas that affect self-control. Source: Science Daily, https://www.sciencedaily.com

Lung cell transplant boosts healing after the flu in mice

A serious case of the flu can cause lasting damage to the lungs. In a study in mice, researchers found that transplanting cells from the lungs of healthy animals enhanced healing in others that had had a severe respiratory infection. Source: Science Daily, https://www.sciencedaily.com

New, healthier 'butter' spread almost entirely water

Food scientists have created a new low-calorie ‘butter’ spread that consists mostly of water. A tablespoon of this low-calorie spread has 2.8 grams of fat and 25.2 calories. Butter, on the other hand, which is 84% fat and about 16% water, has about 11 grams of fat and nearly 100 calories. Source: Science Daily, https://www.sciencedaily.com

Toolkit could improve detection and management of iron deficiency in pregnancy

Iron deficiency in pregnancy is a common problem that often goes unrecognized and untreated due to a lack of knowledge of its implications and competing clinical priorities. To enhance screening and management of iron deficiency in pregnancy, a research team has developed a quality improvement toolkit, called IRON MOM. The implementation of IRON MOM resulted … pročitajte više

British food crowned the healthiest in major global survey

It turns out that British food isn’t that terrible, after all. A global survey has found that when it comes to having the healthiest packaged foods and drinks, the UK tops the charts, with the USA in 2nd place and Australia coming in at 3rd. Source: Science Daily, https://www.sciencedaily.com

Is pollution linked to psychiatric disorders?

Researchers are increasingly studying the effects of environmental insults on psychiatric and neurological conditions, motivated by emerging evidence from environmental events like the record-breaking smog that choked New Delhi two years ago. The results suggests a possible link between exposure to environmental pollution and an increase in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Source: Science Daily, … pročitajte više

Discharge incentives in emergency rooms could lead to higher patient readmission rates

In an effort to address emergency department overcrowding, pay-for-performance (P4P) incentive programs have been implemented in various regions around the world, including hospitals in Metro Vancouver. But a new study shows that while such programs can reduce barriers to access for admitted patients, they can also lead to patient discharges associated with return visits and … pročitajte više

New hydrogels show promise in treating bone defects

Bioengineers and dentists have developed a new hydrogel that is more porous and effective in promoting tissue repair and regeneration. Once injected in a mouse model, the new hydrogel is shown to induce migration of naturally occurring stem cells to better promote bone healing. Current experimental applications using hydrogels and stem cells introduced into the … pročitajte više

Examining the link between caste and under-five mortality in India

In India, children that belong to disadvantaged castes face a much higher likelihood of not living past their fifth birthday than their counterparts in non-deprived castes. Researchers examined the association between castes and under-five mortality in an effort to help reduce the burden of under-five deaths in the country. Source: Science Daily, https://www.sciencedaily.com

Multi-tasking protein at the root of neuropathic pain

Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition resulting from nerve injury and is characterized by increased pain sensitivity. Although known to be associated with overly excitable neurons in the spinal cord, the mechanisms leading to chronic pain are poorly understood. Researchers have now shown that expression of a protein called FLRT3 in the spinal dorsal root … pročitajte više

Lab-on-a-chip drives search for new drugs to prevent blood clots

The effectiveness of current anti-clotting medication can be limited due to the risk of complications. This is driving a need for alternatives that can both prevent the formation of blood clots and reduce the risk of excessive and life-threatening bleeding. A new biocompatible lab-on-a-chip could help accelerate the discovery and development of new anti-clotting therapies, … pročitajte više